Current Projects

Adopt-a-Monument

Adopt-a-Monument is a nation-wide Community Archaeology scheme that provides volunteer groups with the practical advice and training they need to care and conserve their local heritage. The project encourages groups to get involved in hands-on activities to improve the condition, accessibility and interpretation of their chosen site.

Work on Adopt-a-Monument
Field Walking at Kildavie

Discovery and excavation in Scotland

Discovery and excavation in Scotland (DES), the annual journal of Archaeology Scotland, is an accessible, comprehensive, up-to-date and invaluable guide to archaeological work being undertaken across Scotland and is an important source of information for everyone with an interest in the archaeology of Scotland. It is sent free of charge each year to Archaeology Scotland members who choose enhanced membership.

Heritage Heroes

Heritage Heroes is an Outreach Project which gives pupils the opportunity to explore their local heritage with the help and expertise of local community groups.

Learning outdoors adds to the fun of the Heritage Heroes project
Learning outdoors adds to the fun of the Heritage Heroes project

Resourcing Scotland’s Heritage

Resourcing Scotland’s Heritage is a three year partnership initiative with Arts & Business Scotland, Archaeology Scotland, Built Environment Forum Scotland, greenspace scotland and Museums Galleries Scotland. The programme is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund Catalyst grants to deliver a capacity building programme for heritage organisations across Scotland.

Scottish Archaeology Month

Scottish Archaeology Month promotes hundreds of events taking place all over Scotland. From the Shetlands to the Scottish Borders, there are free talks, tours, exhibitions, workshops and hands-on events to help you discover some of the amazing archaeology on your doorstep.

Scottish Graveyards

Graveyards represent one of the nation’s most tangible links to its past. Although burial grounds are a familiar part of our historic landscape, surprisingly little is known about the range of burial sites which survive the sorts of gravestones and features they contain, and how well this important resource is faring against the effects of time and the elements. Scotland’s Historic Graveyards web resource provides the resources groups need to take on all aspects of graveyard recording and conservation.

Graveyard survey at Kilvickeon Old Parish Church
Graveyard survey at Kilvickeon Old Parish Church

World War 1

Work to commemorate the centenary of The Great War (1914 to 1918). Here we hope you will be inspired to get involved in contributing to our understanding of the archaeological evidence for WW1 in Scotland and the stories it tells.

RCAHMS Field Survey Digital Photography A steel and concrete built gun-emplacement guards the pier at St Kilda village (NF19NW 1). The gun and sunken magazine were completed during October 1918 after a bombardment by a U-boat the previous May. View f
RCAHMS Field Survey Digital Photography A steel and concrete built gun-emplacement guards the pier at St Kilda village (NF19NW 1). The gun and sunken magazine were completed during October 1918 after a bombardment by a U-boat the previous May.

Past Projects

Carved Stones/Graveyards

The Carved Stones Adviser project ran from 2001 to 2004 and during this time Dr Susan Buckham worked with us as our Carved Stones Adviser. The project brought together professional and community groups to promote good practice in safeguarding historic graveyards through a recording and conservation programme.

Volunteers conducting graveyard survey
Volunteers conducting graveyard survey

From the Ground Up

The From the Ground Up project, which ran until March 2015, allowed our established journal – Discovery and excavation in Scotland to be developed as a fully accessible, rapid reporting online journal.

Broch of Gurness, Orkney (Copyright Jane Bunting)
Broch of Gurness, Orkney (Copyright Jane Bunting)

Homeland Argyll and Bute

Homeland Argyll and Bute was an innovative collaborative project linking rural communities with our national festival, Scottish Archaeology Month and other events to support and train local groups to share their experiences of engaging with archaeology using new media.

Creative Scotland logo

Jacobites in Stirling

As 2015 was the 300th anniversary of the 1715 Jacobite rebellion, including the Battle of Sheriffmuir, our project aimed to highlight some Jacobite activity in Dunblane and Stirling by conducting community digs.

Families at St Ninians dig
Families at St Ninians dig

National Archaeology Days

We really got involved in the idea of public events back in 1996 when we teamed up with the Scottish CivicTrust (who co-ordinate Doors Open Days in Scotland) and the Young Archaeologists’ Club, in order to promote free events such as guided walks and talks on local archaeological sites. National Archaeology Days proved so popular that it lead to the development of Scotland’s own Scottish Archaeology Month.

World Heritage Day, Croy

Rural Land Use

There are over 200,000 archaeological and historic sites in Scotland, most of which are in rural areas. Only 6% of these have statutory protection as Scheduled Monuments or Listed Buildings and normal farming and forestry operations are exempt from the planning process. This project gave advices and resources to farmers, foresters and the general public on how historic environment features and landscapes can best be looked after as part of good rural land management.

Scottish Archaeological Fair

Bringing people together to celebrate archaeology and history, the bi-ennial Scottish Archaeology Fair is currently on-hold.

Archaeology Fair, Dunfermline

Shorewatch: Monitoring Scotland’s Coastal Archaeology

During the late 1990’s Archaeology Scotland appointed a project officer to carry out a feasibility study to investigate the potential for involving groups of people in monitoring stretches of coastline to record erosion to coastal archaeological sites. Such groups included local history groups, archaeology societies, and community groups, as well as individual members of the public.

Moving the house, Sandwick, June 07

Volunteer Outreach Project

The Volunteer Outreach Project was originally conceived as a pilot project based in Midlothian managed by a part-time Outreach Officer. The project offered schools and Additional Special Needs (ASN) students, the chance to participate in a range of exciting, hands-on archaeological activities in their school or at their group.

Drawing of a Roman lamp by a primary school child
Drawing of a Roman lamp by a primary school child

Women at War

‘Women at War’ is a collaborative community engagement project developed by Archaeology Scotland. The project aims to support volunteers in recording the disused Fearn Airfield in Ross and Cromarty, Highlands. The project worked with female volunteers; focusing on the needs of local women who would like to learn additional key-transferable skills and take part in a heritage recording project.

One of the many upstanding buildings which still survive at RAF Fearn
One of the many upstanding buildings which still survive at RAF Fearn